Decimeters to Leagues Converter (dm to league)
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Convert Leagues to Decimeters (league to dm) ▶

Conversion Table

decimeters to leagues
dmleague
10000 dm 0.18 league
20000 dm 0.36 league
30000 dm 0.54 league
40000 dm 0.7199 league
50000 dm 0.8999 league
60000 dm 1.0799 league
70000 dm 1.2599 league
80000 dm 1.4399 league
90000 dm 1.6199 league
100000 dm 1.7999 league
110000 dm 1.9798 league
120000 dm 2.1598 league
130000 dm 2.3398 league
140000 dm 2.5198 league
150000 dm 2.6998 league
160000 dm 2.8798 league
170000 dm 3.0598 league
180000 dm 3.2397 league
190000 dm 3.4197 league
200000 dm 3.5997 league

How to convert

1 decimeter (dm) = 1.79986E-05 league (league). Decimeter (dm) is a unit of Length used in Metric system. League (league) is a unit of Length used in Standard system.

Decimeter: A Unit of Length Used in the Metric System

The decimeter (dm) is a unit of length in the metric system, which is the most widely used system of measurement in the world. The decimeter is equal to one tenth of a meter, which is the SI base unit of length. The decimeter is also a derived unit in the International System of Units (SI), which is the official system of measurement for science and engineering. The symbol for decimeter is dm. The decimeter is used for measuring medium distances and dimensions, such as the height of a bookshelf or the width of a door. The decimeter is also used for measuring volumes, such as the volume of a cube or a box. The decimeter is named after the deci prefix, which means one tenth in Latin. In this article, we will explore the definition, history, usage and conversion of the decimeter as a unit of length.

Definition of Decimeter

The decimeter is a unit of length that is equal to one tenth of a meter. It is defined as 1/10 meters. The meter is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299792458 seconds.

The definition of the decimeter has not changed since its introduction by the French Academy of Sciences in 1795, as part of the decimal metric system that was adopted after the French Revolution. However, the definition of the meter has changed several times over time, as different standards and methods of measurement were developed by various countries and organizations. The current definition of the meter as based on the speed of light was agreed upon by an international treaty in 1983.

History of Decimeter

The origin of the decimeter as a unit of length can be traced back to 1795, when the French Academy of Sciences proposed a new system of measurement that was based on decimal fractions and natural constants. The system was called the metric system, and it was intended to replace the old and diverse systems of measurement that were used in France and other countries at that time. The metric system was designed to be simple, universal and rational.

The base unit of length in the metric system was the meter, which was defined as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole along a meridian through Paris. The meter was divided into ten decimeters, each decimeter into ten centimeters, and each centimeter into ten millimeters. The prefixes deci, centi and milli indicated that they were one tenth, one hundredth and one thousandth of a meter respectively.

The metric system was officially adopted by France in 1799, and gradually spread to other countries over the next century. In 1875, an international treaty called the Metre Convention was signed by 17 countries to establish a common standard for measuring length and mass. The treaty also established an international organization called the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) to maintain and improve the metric system.

In 1889, a new standard for the meter was created by using a platinum-iridium bar that was kept at BIPM. This bar was called the International Prototype Metre, and it was divided into ten equal parts to make standard decimeters. The bar was also compared with other national standards to ensure accuracy and consistency.

In 1960, an international conference called the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) adopted a new system of measurement called the International System of Units (SI), which was based on seven base units that could be derived from physical constants. The meter was redefined as 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of light emitted by a krypton-86 atom in a vacuum. The decimeter remained as a derived unit in SI, but it was no longer recommended for use in scientific and technical fields.

In 1983, another CGPM conference redefined the meter again as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299792458 seconds. This definition was based on the speed of light, which is a universal constant that can be measured with high precision. The decimeter also changed accordingly to reflect this new definition.

Usage of Decimeter

The decimeter is a unit of length that is used for measuring medium distances and dimensions, such as the height of a bookshelf or the width of a door. The decimeter is also used for measuring volumes, such as the volume of a cube or a box.

The decimeter is commonly used in everyday life, especially in countries that follow the metric system. Some examples are:

  • Measuring the dimensions of furniture and appliances.
  • Measuring the size of books and magazines.
  • Measuring the capacity of containers and bottles.
  • Measuring the depth of water and soil.
  • Measuring the distance between objects and landmarks.

The decimeter is also used in some scientific and technical fields, such as:

  • Measuring the diameter and circumference of circles and cylinders.
  • Measuring the volume and surface area of solids and liquids.
  • Measuring the density and specific gravity of substances.
  • Measuring the pressure and temperature of gases and fluids.
  • Measuring the focal length and magnification of lenses and mirrors.

How to Convert Decimeter

The decimeter can be converted to other units of length by using conversion factors or formulas. Here are some examples of how to convert decimeters to other units of length in the SI system, the US customary system and other systems:

  • To convert decimeters to centimeters, multiply by 10. For example, 10 dm = 10 × 10 = 100 cm.
  • To convert decimeters to meters, divide by 10. For example, 10 dm = 10 / 10 = 1 m.
  • To convert decimeters to kilometers, divide by 10000. For example, 10 dm = 10 / 10000 = 0.001 km.
  • To convert decimeters to inches, multiply by 3.937. For example, 10 dm = 10 × 3.937 = 39.37 in.
  • To convert decimeters to feet, multiply by 0.328. For example, 10 dm = 10 × 0.328 = 3.28 ft.
Decimeters also can be marked as decimetres.

League: A Unit of Length

The league is an old unit of length that was common in Europe and Latin America, but is no longer official in any nation. It was derived from an ancient Celtic unit and adopted by the Romans. It was the distance a person or a horse could walk in about one hour, usually about 3 to 5 kilometers. The league varied in length from 2.4 to 4.6 statute miles in different regions.

In this article, we will explore the definition, history, usage and conversion of the league as a unit of length.

Definition of the League

The league is a unit of length that is equal to 3 miles or 4.8 kilometers in the English-speaking countries. However, the word league often refers to the Spanish, Portuguese or French league, which have different values.

The Spanish league was originally defined as 5,000 varas (a Spanish yard), about 2.6 miles or 4.2 kilometers. The Portuguese league was also 5,000 varas, but the vara was slightly longer, making the league about 2.7 miles or 4.4 kilometers. The French league was based on the nautical mile and was equal to 3 nautical miles or 5.6 kilometers.

The league is not a standard unit and has no symbol.

History of the League

The origin of the league as a unit of length can be traced back to ancient times, when it was used as a measure of distance based on the human or animal pace. The word league comes from the Latin word leuga, which was derived from the Celtic word leuca. It referred to the distance that could be covered by a person or a horse in one hour.

The league was used by the Romans, who defined it as one and a half Roman miles (7,500 Roman feet or 2.2 kilometers). The Roman league was also called leuga Gallica (the Gaulish league) or leuga Germanica (the Germanic league), depending on the region.

The league was adopted by other countries that followed the Roman system of measurement, such as Spain, Portugal and France. It varied in length from country to country and from time to time, depending on local standards and methods of measurement.

The league was abolished by Philip II of Spain in 1568, but it continued to be used unofficially in some parts of Latin America. The league was also incorporated into the imperial system of measurement, which was established by an act of Parliament in 1824. The imperial system was based on seven base units that could be derived from natural and traditional units. The league remained as a derived unit in the imperial system, but it was no longer recommended for use in scientific and technical fields.

Usage of the League

The league is a unit of length that is used for measuring long distances and dimensions, such as the length of a road or the circumference of a lake.

The league is rarely used in modern times, except for historical or literary purposes. However, some countries still use it for some specific applications.

For example:

  • In Argentina, a league is equal to 5 kilometers and is used for measuring land area.
  • In Brazil, a league is equal to 6 kilometers and is used for measuring distances on roads and highways.
  • In Mexico, a league is variable and depends on the terrain and the mode of transportation. It is used for measuring distances between towns and villages.
  • In France, a league is equal to 4 kilometers and is used for measuring distances on maps and signs.
  • In Spain, a league is equal to 4 kilometers and is used for measuring distances on roads and highways.

Example Conversions of League to Other Units

The league can be converted to other units of length by using different factors and formulas. Here are some examples of conversion for different types of leagues:

  • To convert an English league to miles, multiply by 3:

1 English league x 3 = 3 miles

  • To convert an English league to kilometers, multiply by 4.8:

1 English league x 4.8 = 4.8 kilometers

  • To convert a Spanish league to miles, multiply by 2.6:

1 Spanish league x 2.6 = 2.6 miles

  • To convert a Spanish league to kilometers, multiply by 4.2:

1 Spanish league x 4.2 = 4.2 kilometers

  • To convert a Portuguese league to miles, multiply by 2.7:

1 Portuguese league x 2.7 = 2.7 miles

  • To convert a Portuguese league to kilometers, multiply by 4.4:

1 Portuguese league x 4.4 = 4.4 kilometers

  • To convert a French league to miles, multiply by 3.5:

1 French league x 3.5 = 3.5 miles

  • To convert a French league to kilometers, multiply by 5.6:

1 French league x 5.6 = 5.6 kilometers

  • To convert a mile to leagues, divide by the appropriate factor:

1 mile / 3 = 0.333 English leagues

1 mile / 2.6 = 0.385 Spanish leagues

1 mile / 2.7 = 0.370 Portuguese leagues

1 mile / 3.5 = 0.286 French leagues

  • To convert a kilometer to leagues, divide by the appropriate factor:

1 kilometer / 4.8 = 0.208 English leagues

1 kilometer / 4.2 = 0.238 Spanish leagues

1 kilometer / 4.4 = 0.227 Portuguese leagues

1 kilometer / 5.6 = 0.179 French leagues



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