Chains to Decimeters Converter (ch to dm)
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Convert Decimeters to Chains (dm to ch) ▶

Conversion Table

chains to decimeters
chdm
1 ch 201.168 dm
2 ch 402.336 dm
3 ch 603.504 dm
4 ch 804.672 dm
5 ch 1005.84 dm
6 ch 1207.008 dm
7 ch 1408.176 dm
8 ch 1609.344 dm
9 ch 1810.512 dm
10 ch 2011.68 dm
11 ch 2212.848 dm
12 ch 2414.016 dm
13 ch 2615.184 dm
14 ch 2816.352 dm
15 ch 3017.52 dm
16 ch 3218.688 dm
17 ch 3419.856 dm
18 ch 3621.024 dm
19 ch 3822.192 dm
20 ch 4023.36 dm

How to convert

1 chain (ch) = 201.168 decimeter (dm). Chain (ch) is a unit of Length used in Standard system. Decimeter (dm) is a unit of Length used in Metric system.

Chain: A Unit of Length Used for Measuring Land

The chain is a unit of length that is equal to 66 feet or 22 yards or 4 rods or 100 links. It is part of the US customary and imperial measurement systems. It is used for measuring land, especially in surveying and mapping. The symbol for chain is ch. There are 10 chains in a furlong, and 80 chains in one statute mile. An acre is the area of 10 square chains. The unit is named after the chain, a measuring device that was invented by Edmund Gunter, a clergyman and mathematician, in the 17th century. The chain is also sometimes called a Gunter’s chain, a surveyor’s chain or a land chain. In this article, we will explore the definition, history, usage and conversion of the chain as a unit of length.

Definition of the Unit

The chain is a unit of length that is equal to 66 feet or 22 yards or 4 rods or 100 links. It is one of the base units in the US customary and imperial measurement systems, along with the foot, the yard and the mile. The chain is also a derived unit in the International System of Units (SI), which is the most widely used system of measurement in the world. The SI base unit of length is the meter, which is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299792458 seconds.

The definition of the chain has not changed since its introduction by Edmund Gunter in 1620, who based it on an earlier English unit called an acre’s breadth, which was equal to one-tenth of a furlong or one-eightieth of a mile. However, the definition of the foot, which is used to define the chain, has changed several times over time, as different standards and methods of measurement were adopted by various countries and regions. The current definition of the foot as 0.3048 meter was agreed upon by an international treaty in 1959.

History of the Unit

The origin of the chain as a unit of length can be traced back to 1620, when Edmund Gunter created a measuring device called a chain. The chain was 66 feet long and consisted of 100 metal links connected by three rings each. The links were made of thick wire with a loop at each end. The chain had brass handles at each end for holding and folding. Gunter chose this unit because it was convenient for his work on surveying and mapping land. He also named this unit after himself, as he wrote in his book: "I have taken as unit for these measurements one hundredth part [of a furlong], which I will call an Chain".

Gunter’s unit was soon adopted by other surveyors and mapmakers, who found it useful for measuring distances and areas on flat or gently sloping land. The chain was also used for laying out roads, railways and canals. The chain became part of the US customary and imperial measurement systems, which were based on earlier English units that were brought by British settlers to America. The chain was also used in some other countries influenced by British practice, such as Canada and India.

In 1785, when the United States Congress passed the Land Ordinance Act to survey and divide the public land west of the Appalachian Mountains into rectangular townships and sections, the use of the chain as a unit of measurement was mandated by law. The act also defined the chain as equal to four rods or poles or perches. The surveyors who carried out this work were known as "chain bearers" or "chain carriers", and they marked each mile along their survey lines with wooden posts called "milestones".

In 1959, when the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and some other Commonwealth countries agreed to adopt a common definition of the foot as 0.3048 meter, based on the international yard that was defined as 0.9144 meter by an international treaty in 1959, the chain became exactly equal to 20.1168 meters.

Usage of the Unit

The chain is a unit of length that is used for measuring land, especially in surveying and mapping. The chain is also used for measuring distances on roads, railways and canals. The chain is still used in some rural areas and historical contexts in the United States, Canada and some other countries that follow the US customary or imperial measurement systems.

The chain is used for various purposes, such as:

  • Measuring length, width and area of land parcels and properties.
  • Measuring distances and dimensions on maps and plans.
  • Measuring boundaries and borders between states, counties and townships.
  • Measuring road widths and lengths.
  • Measuring railway track gauges and lengths.
  • Measuring canal widths and depths.
  • How to Convert

    The chain can be converted to other units of length by using conversion factors or formulas. Here are some examples of how to convert chains to other units of length in the US customary system, the imperial system and the SI system:

  • To convert chains to feet, multiply by 66. For example, 10 ch = 10 × 66 = 660 ft.
  • To convert chains to yards, multiply by 22. For example, 10 ch = 10 × 22 = 220 yd.
  • To convert chains to miles, divide by 80. For example, 10 ch = 10 / 80 = 0.125 mi.
  • To convert chains to centimeters, multiply by 2011.68. For example, one ch = one × 2011.68 = 2011.68 cm.
  • To convert chains to meters, multiply by 20.1168. For example, one ch = one × 20.1168 = 20.1168 m.
  • To convert chains to kilometers, divide by 49.7097. For example, 10 ch = 10 / 49.7097 = 0.2012 km.

Equivalents in Other Units and Scales

The chain can be expressed in terms of other units of length by using equivalent values or ratios. Here are some examples of how to express chains in other units of length:

  • One chain is equal to four rods or poles or perches.
  • One chain is equal to one-tenth of a furlong or one-eightieth of a mile.
  • One chain is equal to one-hundredth of a league or one-fortieth of a league (US).
  • One chain is equal to one-hundred-millionth of an astronomical unit or one-forty-billionth of a light-year.
  • One chain is equal to one-thousandth of a nautical mile or one-three-thousand-six-hundredth of a degree of latitude or longitude.

Decimeter: A Unit of Length Used in the Metric System

The decimeter (dm) is a unit of length in the metric system, which is the most widely used system of measurement in the world. The decimeter is equal to one tenth of a meter, which is the SI base unit of length. The decimeter is also a derived unit in the International System of Units (SI), which is the official system of measurement for science and engineering. The symbol for decimeter is dm. The decimeter is used for measuring medium distances and dimensions, such as the height of a bookshelf or the width of a door. The decimeter is also used for measuring volumes, such as the volume of a cube or a box. The decimeter is named after the deci prefix, which means one tenth in Latin. In this article, we will explore the definition, history, usage and conversion of the decimeter as a unit of length.

Definition of Decimeter

The decimeter is a unit of length that is equal to one tenth of a meter. It is defined as 1/10 meters. The meter is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299792458 seconds.

The definition of the decimeter has not changed since its introduction by the French Academy of Sciences in 1795, as part of the decimal metric system that was adopted after the French Revolution. However, the definition of the meter has changed several times over time, as different standards and methods of measurement were developed by various countries and organizations. The current definition of the meter as based on the speed of light was agreed upon by an international treaty in 1983.

History of Decimeter

The origin of the decimeter as a unit of length can be traced back to 1795, when the French Academy of Sciences proposed a new system of measurement that was based on decimal fractions and natural constants. The system was called the metric system, and it was intended to replace the old and diverse systems of measurement that were used in France and other countries at that time. The metric system was designed to be simple, universal and rational.

The base unit of length in the metric system was the meter, which was defined as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole along a meridian through Paris. The meter was divided into ten decimeters, each decimeter into ten centimeters, and each centimeter into ten millimeters. The prefixes deci, centi and milli indicated that they were one tenth, one hundredth and one thousandth of a meter respectively.

The metric system was officially adopted by France in 1799, and gradually spread to other countries over the next century. In 1875, an international treaty called the Metre Convention was signed by 17 countries to establish a common standard for measuring length and mass. The treaty also established an international organization called the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) to maintain and improve the metric system.

In 1889, a new standard for the meter was created by using a platinum-iridium bar that was kept at BIPM. This bar was called the International Prototype Metre, and it was divided into ten equal parts to make standard decimeters. The bar was also compared with other national standards to ensure accuracy and consistency.

In 1960, an international conference called the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) adopted a new system of measurement called the International System of Units (SI), which was based on seven base units that could be derived from physical constants. The meter was redefined as 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of light emitted by a krypton-86 atom in a vacuum. The decimeter remained as a derived unit in SI, but it was no longer recommended for use in scientific and technical fields.

In 1983, another CGPM conference redefined the meter again as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299792458 seconds. This definition was based on the speed of light, which is a universal constant that can be measured with high precision. The decimeter also changed accordingly to reflect this new definition.

Usage of Decimeter

The decimeter is a unit of length that is used for measuring medium distances and dimensions, such as the height of a bookshelf or the width of a door. The decimeter is also used for measuring volumes, such as the volume of a cube or a box.

The decimeter is commonly used in everyday life, especially in countries that follow the metric system. Some examples are:

  • Measuring the dimensions of furniture and appliances.
  • Measuring the size of books and magazines.
  • Measuring the capacity of containers and bottles.
  • Measuring the depth of water and soil.
  • Measuring the distance between objects and landmarks.

The decimeter is also used in some scientific and technical fields, such as:

  • Measuring the diameter and circumference of circles and cylinders.
  • Measuring the volume and surface area of solids and liquids.
  • Measuring the density and specific gravity of substances.
  • Measuring the pressure and temperature of gases and fluids.
  • Measuring the focal length and magnification of lenses and mirrors.

How to Convert Decimeter

The decimeter can be converted to other units of length by using conversion factors or formulas. Here are some examples of how to convert decimeters to other units of length in the SI system, the US customary system and other systems:

  • To convert decimeters to centimeters, multiply by 10. For example, 10 dm = 10 × 10 = 100 cm.
  • To convert decimeters to meters, divide by 10. For example, 10 dm = 10 / 10 = 1 m.
  • To convert decimeters to kilometers, divide by 10000. For example, 10 dm = 10 / 10000 = 0.001 km.
  • To convert decimeters to inches, multiply by 3.937. For example, 10 dm = 10 × 3.937 = 39.37 in.
  • To convert decimeters to feet, multiply by 0.328. For example, 10 dm = 10 × 0.328 = 3.28 ft.
Decimeters also can be marked as decimetres.



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